Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 21 No 11 Nov/Dec 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Price: £99.95

Pupillage & Student Offers

Special Discounts for Pupils, Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


Hate Crimes: Criminal Law and Identity Politics (eBook)


ISBN13: 9780190286316
ISBN: 0195140540
Published: June 2002
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Country of Publication: USA
Format: eBook (ePub)
Price: £12.91 + £2.58 VAT
The amount of VAT charged may change depending on your location of use.


Once the order is confirmed an automated e-mail will be sent to you to allow you to download the eBook.

All eBooks are supplied firm sale and cannot be returned. If you believe there is a fault with your eBook then contact us on ebooks@wildy.com and we will help in resolving the issue. This does not affect your statutory rights.

This eBook is available in the following formats: ePub.


In stock.
Need help with ebook formats?


Also available as

In early-1980s America, a new category of crime appeared in the criminal law lexicon. In response to concerted advocacy-group lobbying, Congress and many state legislatures passed a wave of ""hate crime"" laws requiring the collection of statistics on, and enhancing the punishment for, crimes motivated by certain prejudices.

This book places the evolution of the hate crime concept in socio-legal perspective. James B. Jacobs and Kimberly Potter adopt a skeptical if not critical stance, maintaining that legal definitions of hate crime are riddled with ambiguity and subjectivity. No matter how hate crime is defined, and despite an apparent media consensus to the contrary, the authors find no evidence to support the claim that the United States is experiencing a hate crime epidemic - instead, they cast doubt on whether the number of hate crimes is even increasing.

The authors further assert that, while the federal effort to establish a reliable hate crime accounting system has failed, data collected for this purpose have led to widespread misinterpretation of the state of intergroup relations in the USA;The book contends that hate crime as a socio-legal category represents the elaborati