Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 23 No 8 Aug/Sept 18

Book of the Month

Cover of Housing Allocations and Homelessness: Law and Practice

Housing Allocations and Homelessness: Law and Practice

Price: £99.99 + £10.30 VAT

Offers for Newly Called Barristers & Students

Special Discounts for Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


Biall2018b
20pcswmx
Pensions divorce
Blackstone 2019
Mental capacity
Arch mags 2019

Legal Integration and Language Diversity: Rethinking Translation in EU Lawmaking


ISBN13: 9780190680787
Published: April 2018
Publisher: Oxford University Press USA
Country of Publication: USA
Format: Hardback
Price: £64.00



Despatched in 8 to 10 days.

How can the European Union create laws that are uniform in a multitude of languages? Specifically, how can it attain both legal integration and language diversity simultaneously, without the latter compromising the former? C.J.W. Baaij argues that the answer lies in the domain of translation.

A uniform interpretation and application of EU law begins with the ways in which translators and jurist-linguists of the EU legislative bodies translate the original legislative draft texts into the various language versions.

In the European Union, law and language are inherently connected. The EU pursues legal integration, i.e. the incremental harmonization and unification of its Member States' laws, for the purpose of reducing national regulatory differences between Member States. However, in its commitment to the diversity of European languages, its legislative institutions enact legislative instruments in 24 languages.

Legal Integration and Language Diversity assesses these seemingly incompatible policy objectives and contemporary translation practices in the EU legislative procedure, and proposes an alternative, source-oriented approach that better serves EU policy objectives. Contrary to the orthodox view in academic literature and to the current policies of the EU, this book suggests that the English language version should serve as the original and only authentic legislative text.

Translation into the other language versions should furthermore avoid prioritizing clarity and fluency over syntactic correspondence and employ neologisms for distinctly EU legal concepts.

Ultimately, Baaij provides practical solutions to the conflict between the equality of all language versions, and the need for uniform interpretation and application of EU law.

Subjects:
EU Law
Contents:
1. Introduction
2. Articulating the Task of EU Translation
3. Formalizing the Primacy of English
4. The Mixed Approach of Current EU Translation
5. Considering a Source-Oriented Alternative
6. The Implementation and Its Challenges
7. Summary and Conclusions
Annex I: Language Cases (1960-2010)
Annex II: Anonymized Table of Interviews