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Vol 21 No 9 Sept/Oct 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Goode on Commercial Law

Goode on Commercial Law

Edited by: Ewan McKendrick
Price: £170.00

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Corruption: A Very Short Introduction (eBook)

ISBN13: 9780191003912
Published: April 2015
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: eBook (ePub)
Price: £6.66 + £1.33 VAT
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Corruption is one of the biggest global issues, ahead of extreme poverty, unemployment, the rising cost of food and energy, climate change, and terrorism. It is thought to be one of the principal causes of poverty around the globe. Its significance in the contemporary world cannot be undervalued.

In this Very Short Introduction Leslie Holmes considers why the international community has only highlighted corruption as a problem in the past two decades, despite its presence throughout the millennia. Holmes explores the phenomenon from several different perspectives, from the cultural differences affecting how corruption is defined, its impact, and its various causes to the possible remedies. Providing evidence of corruption and considering ways to address it around the world, this is an important introduction to a significant and serious global issue.

Criminal Law, eBooks
1. What is corruption?
2. Why corruption is a problem
3. Can we measure corruption?
4. Psycho-social and cultural causes
5. System-related causes
6. What can states do?
7. What else can be done?
Further reading