Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 21 No 10 Oct/Nov 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Price: £99.95

Pupillage & Student Offers

Special Discounts for Pupils, Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


Medical Law: A Very Short Introduction (eBook)


ISBN13: 9780191636011
Published: February 2013
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: eBook (ePub)
Price: £6.66 + £1.33 VAT
The amount of VAT charged may change depending on your location of use.


Once the order is confirmed an automated e-mail will be sent to you to allow you to download the eBook.

All eBooks are supplied firm sale and cannot be returned. If you believe there is a fault with your eBook then contact us on ebooks@wildy.com and we will help in resolving the issue. This does not affect your statutory rights.

This eBook is available in the following formats: ePub.


In stock.
Need help with ebook formats?

Medical law is concerned with our bodies, and what happens to them during and after our lives. When things go wrong with our bodies, we want to know what our rights are, and what governs the conduct of the clinicians into whose hands we put our lives and limbs.

Dealing with matters of life and death, it can therefore have a fundamental impact on medical practice. Headlines in the media often involve the core issues of medical law - organ transplantation, abortion, withdrawal of treatment, euthanasia, confidentiality, research on humans - these are topics that affect us all. Headlines can misrepresent, however.

In order to fully understand the issues and their relevance, we have to delve into the cases and into the principles behind them. In this highly readable Very Short Introduction, Charles Foster explores different examples to illustrate the key problems and principles of medical law.

Subjects:
Medical Law, eBooks
Contents:
Acknowledgements
1. Origins and legacies
2. The enforcement of medical law
3. Before birth
4. Confidentiality and privacy
5. Consent
6. Clinical negligence
7. Research on human subjects
8. Resource allocation
9. The end of life
10. Organ donation and the ownership of body parts
11. The future of medical law
References: Cases discussed
Further reading