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Vol 22 No 4 April/May 2017

Book of the Month

Cover of Whistleblowing: Law and Practice

Whistleblowing: Law and Practice

Price: £175.00

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The Idea of Human Rights - Four Inquiries

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ISBN13: 9780195116366
ISBN: 0195116364
Published: June 1998
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Country of Publication: USA
Format: Hardback
Price: £58.00
Paperback edition , ISBN13 9780195138283



Despatched in 5 to 7 days.

Also available as
£23.74
+ £4.75 VAT

Of all the influential-indeed, formative-moral ideas to occupy centre stage in the twentieth century, the notion of human rights is for many the most difficult. Inspired by a 1988 trip to El Salvador, Michael Perry's new book explores this idea in full. His typically lucid exposition of this complex issue (one so rich in social, political, and philosophical implications, especially at the international level) is rooted in the recognition that every human being is sacred, "inviolable," has "inherent dignity" and worth, and is an end to himself. Therefore, in Perry's view, the concept of human rights is inescapably religious. But are human rights universal? And are they absolute? The latest thinking from one of our nation's leading authorities on morality, politics, and religion, The Idea of Human Rights: Four Inquiries addresses these questions adroitly. The legal and moral dimensions of "rights" rhetoric itself-such as its meanings and functions-are also carefully considered.