(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 24 No 1 Jan/Feb 2019

Book of the Month

Cover of Blackstone's Civil Practice 2019

Blackstone's Civil Practice 2019

Edited by: Stuart Sime, Derek French
Price: £325.00

Offers for Newly Called Barristers & Students

Special Discounts for Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


Hammicks Legal Information Services has been acquired by Wildy and Sons Ltd.

Wildy and Sons would like to welcome customers of Hammicks Legal Information Services which was acquired by Wildys on 25th January 2019.

Information for existing Hammicks credit account customers can be found here.

Hide this message

Making Murder Public: Homicide in Early Modern England, 1480-1680


ISBN13: 9780198835622
To be Published: February 2019
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £60.00



Homicide has a history. In early modern England, that history saw two especially notable developments: one, the emergence in the sixteenth century of a formal distinction between murder and manslaughter, made meaningful through a lighter punishment than death for the latter, and two, a significant reduction in the rates of homicides individuals perpetrated on each other.

Making Murder Public explores connections between these two changes. It demonstrates the value in distinguishing between murder and manslaughter, or at least in seeing how that distinction came to matter in a period which also witnessed dramatic drops in the occurrence of homicidal violence. Focused on the 'politics of murder', Making Murder Public examines how homicide became more effectively criminalized between 1480 and 1680, with chapters devoted to coroners' inquests, appeals and private compensation, duels and private vengeance, and print and public punishment. The English had begun moving away from treating homicide as an offence subject to private settlements or vengeance long before other Europeans, at least from the twelfth century. What happened in the early modern period was, in some ways, a continuation of processes long underway, but intensified and refocused by developments from 1480 to 1680.

Making Murder Public argues that homicide became fully 'public' in these years, with killings seen to violate a 'king's peace' that people increasingly conflated with or subordinated to the 'public peace' or 'public justice.'

Subjects:
Legal History
Contents:
Acknowledgements
Abbreviations and Conventions
1: Introduction
2: 'In Corona Populi': Early Modern Coroners and their Inquests
3: 'An Image of Deadly Feud': Recompense, Revenge, and the Appeal of Homicide
4: 'That Saucy Paradox': The Politics of Duelling in Early Modern England
5: 'For Publick Satisfaction': Punishment, Print, Plays, and Public Vengenance
Conclusion
Appendix I: The Records and the Database
Bibliography