Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 21 No 11 Nov/Dec 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Price: £99.95

Pupillage & Student Offers

Special Discounts for Pupils, Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


The Right to Health in International Law


ISBN13: 9780199603299
Published: January 2012
Publisher: Oxford University Press USA
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £82.00



Despatched in 4 to 6 days.

Also available as
£65.00
+ £13.00 VAT

The link between health and human rights has been recognised for many years, but the increasing visibility of the right to health in international law has been a distinct feature of the last decade. It has been embraced by actors within civil society, academics, health professionals, lawyers and courts in several jurisdictions as a tool to address health inequalities at the local and global level, in matters ranging from access to medicines and the availability of affordable health care to sexual and reproductive health. But it has equally been the subject of derision and scorn by human rights sceptics who have described it as lacking foundation, nebulous, and incapable of implementation. This book seeks to offer a comprehensive discussion of the status and meaning of the right to health in international law. It traces the history of this right to reveal its nexus with public health and the long-standing recognition that a State has a responsibility to attend to the health needs of its population. It also offers a theoretical account of its conceptual foundations which challenges the position held by many philosophers that health is undeserving of the status of a human right. By developing an interpretative methodology, the book provides a persuasive account of the meaning of the right to health and the obligations it imposes on States. This process reveals an understanding of the right to health that, while challenging, remains practical and capable of guiding States that are genuinely committed to addressing the health needs of their population.

Subjects:
Human Rights and Civil Liberties
Contents:
Introduction
PART I
1. The history of the right to health
2. The conceptual foundations of the right to health
PART II
3. A methodology to interpret the right to health
4. The meaning of the highest attainable standard of health
5. The meaning of the general obligation to recognise the right to health
6. The specific measures required to recognise the right to health
7. The meaning of the obligation to protect against harmful traditional practices
8. The meaning of the obligation of international co-operation
Conclusion