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Vol 23 No 4 April/May 2018

Book of the Month

Cover of Williams, Mortimer and Sunnucks: Executors, Administrators and Probate

Williams, Mortimer and Sunnucks: Executors, Administrators and Probate

Edited by: Alexander Learmonth, Charlotte Ford, Julia Clark, John Ross Martyn
Price: £295.00

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The Medieval Origins of the Legal Profession: Canonists, Civilians and Courts


ISBN13: 9780226077604
Published: April 2010
Publisher: The University of Chicago Press
Country of Publication: USA
Format: Paperback (Hardback in 2008)
Price: £34.50
Hardback edition , ISBN13 9780226077598



Low stock.

In the aftermath of sixth-century barbarian invasions, the legal profession that had grown and flourished during the Roman Empire vanished. Nonetheless, professional lawyers suddenly reappeared in Western Europe 700 years later during the 1230s when church councils and public authorities began to impose a body of ethical obligations on those who practiced law.

James Brundage’s The Medieval Origins of the Legal Profession traces the history of legal practice from its genesis in ancient Rome to its rebirth in the early Middle Ages and eventual resurgence in the courts of the medieval church.

By the end of the eleventh century, Brundage argues, renewed interest in Roman law combined with the rise of canon law of the Western church to trigger a series of consolidations in the profession. New legal procedures emerged, formal training for proctors and advocates became necessary in order to practice law in the reorganized church court.

Brundage demonstrates that many features which characterize legal advocacy today were already in place by 1250, as lawyers trained in Roman and canon law became professionals in every sense of the term. A sweeping examination of the centuries-long power struggle between local courts and the Christian church, secular rule and religious edict, The Medieval Origins of the Legal Profession will be a resource for the professional and the student alike.

Subjects:
Legal History