Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 23 No 8 Aug/Sept 18

Book of the Month

Cover of Service Charges: Law and Practice

Service Charges: Law and Practice

Price: £79.99

Offers for Newly Called Barristers & Students

Special Discounts for Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


Biall2018b
Blackstone 2019
Lexis taking security
Lexis insolvency legislation
Archbold 2019 out now

eBook Service Interruption

Please be aware that between 10pm on Monday 15th and 10am on Tuesday 16th morning there will be a delay with any eBook orders. Your order will still be processed and your card will be charged however your eBook will not be supplied until the system is back online. Please do not attempt to repeat your order. Book orders will be processed as normal.

Hide this message

The Sit-Ins: Protest and Legal Change in the Civil Rights Era

Image not available lge

ISBN13: 9780226522449
Published: March 2018
Publisher: The University of Chicago Press
Country of Publication: USA
Format: Paperback
Price: £22.50



Despatched in 7 to 9 days.

Also available as
£22.50
+ £4.50 VAT

On February 1, 1960, four African American college students entered the Woolworth department store in Greensboro, North Carolina, and sat down at the lunch counter. This lunch counter, like most in the American South, refused to serve black customers. The four students remained in their seats until the store closed. In the following days, they returned, joined by growing numbers of fellow students. These "sit-in" demonstrations soon spread to other southern cities, drawing in thousands of students and coalescing into a protest movement that would transform the struggle for racial inequality.

The Sit-Ins tells the story of the student lunch counter protests and the national debate they sparked over the meaning of the constitutional right of all Americans to equal protection of the law. Christopher W. Schmidt describes how behind the now-iconic scenes of African American college students sitting in quiet defiance at "whites only" lunch counters lies a series of underappreciated legal dilemmas--about the meaning of the Constitution, the capacity of legal institutions to remedy different forms of injustice, and the relationship between legal reform and social change. The students' actions initiated a national conversation over whether the Constitution's equal protection clause extended to the activities of private businesses that served the general public. The courts, the traditional focal point for accounts of constitutional disputes, played an important but ultimately secondary role in this story. The great victory of the sit-in movement came not in the Supreme Court, but in Congress, with the passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, landmark legislation that recognized the right African American students had claimed for themselves four years earlier.

The Sit-Ins invites a broader understanding of how Americans contest and construct the meaning of their Constitution.

Image not available lge
Subjects:
Legal History, Other Jurisdictions , USA
Contents:
Introduction
1. The Students
2. The Lawyers
3. The Sympathizers
4. The Opponents
5. The Justices
6. The Lawmakers
Conclusion
Acknowledgments
Abbreviations
Notes
Index