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Vol 21 No 10 Oct/Nov 2016

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Media Law & Ethics in the 21st Century: Protecting Free Expression and Curbing Abuses

Edited by: James Lewis, Paul Crick

ISBN13: 9780230301870
Published: May 2014
Publisher: Pan Macmillan
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £62.50



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The exposure of the excesses of the tabloid press, the Leveson Inquiry and subsequent fears over relinquishing rights to free expression have highlighted the importance of serious journalism to a civilised society and a fully functioning democracy.

This collection of writings brings together some of the foremost authorities on law, journalism and ethics in order to illuminate the unique and ongoing debates on media ethics and the competing rights to privacy and free expression.

The contributors present a range of different perspectives on 21st century events in light of key concerns, including public interest, privacy protection and the challenges posed by the internet, offering responses to media practices and informing public policy.

In addressing the current and future challenges facing different parties, and considering how to strike a balance between freedom of speech and confidentiality, this volume stands as a pertinent and influential examination of the efficacy of media and privacy laws in the UK and the US.

Published in association with the International Bar Association

Subjects:
Media and Entertainment Law
Contents:
Preface
Mark Stephens CBE

PART I: THE LEGAL, ETHICAL AND EDITORIAL LANDSCAPE
1. Privacy: A Judicial Perspective
Justice Eady
2. The Rights of Journalism and the Needs of Audiences
Baroness Onora O'Neill
3. Why we write: three magic words - 'the public interest'
Alan Rusbridger

PART II: THE PRACTITIONER'S VIEW - PROTECTING FREE EXPRESSION AND CURBING ABUSES
4. The Ultimate Balancing Act
Pia Sarma
5. Privacy Protection - Luxury Goods Or Essential Commodity?
Amber Melville-Brown
6. 'People are so much more interesting than things': Protecting free expression
Gavin Millar QC
7. 'You Say Tomato...': A Comparison of English and U.S. Privacy Law Principles
Robert Balin and Yuli Takatsuki

PART III: CONFRONTING CURRENT AND FUTURE CHALLENGES
8. Privacy and Free Expression: competing or complementary rights?
Kirsty Hughes and Michael Harris, Index on Censorship
9. The Internet as a Lens: US Concepts of Privacy in Online Spaces
Jeff Hermes