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Redirecting Human Rights: Facing the Challenge of Corporate Legal Humanity

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ISBN13: 9780230542228
Published: April 2010
Publisher: Palgrave Scholarly
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £81.00



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Against the backdrop of globalization and mounting evidence of the corporate subversion of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights paradigm, Anna Grear interrogates the complex tendencies within law that are implicated in the emergence of 'corporate humanity'. Grear presents a critical account of legal subjectivity, linking it with law's intimate relationship with liberal capitalism in order to suggest law's special receptivity to the corporate form. She argues that in the field of human rights law, particularly within the Universal Declaration of Human Rights paradigm, human embodied vulnerability should be understood as the foundation of human rights and as a key qualifying characteristic of the human rights subject. The need to redirect human rights in order to resist their colonization by powerful economic global actors could scarcely be more urgent.

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Subjects:
Human Rights and Civil Liberties
Contents:
Introduction Human Rights Under Pressure? Corporate Human Rights? Law, Persons and Disembodiment The Liberal Subject of Rights, Capitalism and the Corporation A Genealogy of Quasi-Disembodiment in International Human Rights Law The Centrality of Human Embodiment Embodied Vulnerability and Human Rights Embodied Vulnerability and the Limits of Privatization: Reconsidering Property and Human Rights Some Brief Conclusory Thoughts and Future Research Directions Bibliography