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Vol 23 No 4 April/May 2018

Book of the Month

Cover of Williams, Mortimer and Sunnucks: Executors, Administrators and Probate

Williams, Mortimer and Sunnucks: Executors, Administrators and Probate

Edited by: Alexander Learmonth, Charlotte Ford, Julia Clark, John Ross Martyn
Price: £295.00

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UK Public Holiday Monday 28th May

Wildy's will be closed on Monday 28th May, re-opening on Tuesday 29th.

Online book orders received during the time we are closed will be processed as soon as possible once we re-open on Tuesday.

As usual credit cards will not be charged until the order is processed and ready to despatch.

Any Sweet & Maxwell or Lexis eBook orders placed after 4pm on the Friday 25th May will not be processed until Tuesday May 29th. UK orders for other publishers will be processed as normal. All non-UK eBook orders will be processed on Tuesday May 29th.

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The Era of Transitional Justice: The Aftermath of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa and Beyond


ISBN13: 9780415581165
Published: October 2010
Publisher: Routledge
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £115.00



Despatched in 4 to 6 days.

The Era of Transitional Justice: The Aftermath of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in South Africa and Beyond explores a broad set of issues raised by political transition and transitional justice through the prism of the South African TRC.

South Africa constitutes a powerful case study of the enduring structural legacies of a troubled past, and of both the potential and limitations of transitional justice and human rights as agents of transformation in the contemporary era. South Africa’s story has wider relevance because it helped to launch constitutional human rights and transitional justice as global discourses; as such, its own legacy is to some extent writ large in post-authoritarian and post-conflict contexts across the world.

Based on a decade of research, and in an analysis that is both comparative and interdisciplinary, Paul Gready maintains that transitional justice needs to do more to address structural violence - and in particular poverty, inequality and social and criminal violence - as these have emerged as stubborn legacies from an oppressive or war-torn past in many parts of the world.

Organised around four central themes - new keyword conceptualisation (truth, justice, reconciliation); re-imagining human rights; engaging with the past and present; remaking the public sphere - it is an argument that will be of considerable relevance to those interested in the law and politics of transitional societies.

Subjects:
South Africa, Other Jurisdictions
Contents:
Introduction
1. Truth as Genre
2. From Social Truth to Rights-based Participation
3. Justice Past
4. Justice Present
5. Speaking Truth to Reconciliation
6. Reconciliation, Relationships and the Everyday.
Conclusion