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Vol 23 No 4 April/May 2018

Book of the Month

Cover of Williams, Mortimer and Sunnucks: Executors, Administrators and Probate

Williams, Mortimer and Sunnucks: Executors, Administrators and Probate

Edited by: Alexander Learmonth, Charlotte Ford, Julia Clark, John Ross Martyn
Price: £295.00

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UK Public Holiday Monday 28th May

Wildy's will be closed on Monday 28th May, re-opening on Tuesday 29th.

Online book orders received during the time we are closed will be processed as soon as possible once we re-open on Tuesday.

As usual credit cards will not be charged until the order is processed and ready to despatch.

Any Sweet & Maxwell or Lexis eBook orders placed after 4pm on the Friday 25th May will not be processed until Tuesday May 29th. UK orders for other publishers will be processed as normal. All non-UK eBook orders will be processed on Tuesday May 29th.

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A Search for Sovereignty: Law and Geography in European Empires, 1400–1900


ISBN13: 9780521707435
Published: February 2010
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Paperback
Price: £22.99



This is a Print On Demand Title.
The publisher will print a copy to fulfill your order. Books can take between 1 to 3 weeks. Looseleaf titles between 1 to 2 weeks.

A Search for Sovereignty maps a new approach to world history by examining the relation of law and geography in European empires between 1400 and 1900.

Lauren Benton argues that Europeans imagined imperial space as networks of corridors and enclaves, and that they constructed sovereignty in ways that merged ideas about geography and law. Conflicts over treason, piracy, convict transportation, martial law, and crime created irregular spaces of law, while also attaching legal meanings to familiar geographic categories such as rivers, oceans, islands, and mountains.

The resulting legal and spatial anomalies influenced debates about imperial constitutions and international law both in the colonies and at home. This original study changes our understanding of empire and its legacies and opens new perspectives on the global history of law.

Subjects:
Legal History
Contents:
1. Introduction: anomalies of empire
2. Treacherous places: Atlantic riverine regions and the law of treason
3. Sovereignty at sea: jurisdiction, piracy, and ocean regionalism
4. Island chains: military law and convict transportation
5. Landlocked: colonial enclaves and the problem of quasi-sovereignty
6. Conclusion: bare sovereignty and empire.