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Wildy’s Book News

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Vol 22 No 4 April/May 2017

Book of the Month

Cover of Whistleblowing: Law and Practice

Whistleblowing: Law and Practice

Price: £175.00

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UK Public Holiday May 2017

Wildy's will be closed on Monday 29th May and will re-open on Tuesday 30th May.

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Fairness Versus Welfare

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ISBN13: 9780674006225
ISBN: 0674006224
Published: May 2002
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Format: Hardback
Price: Out of print



By what criteria should public policy be evaluated? Fairness and justice? Or the welfare of individuals? Debate over this fundamental question has spanned the ages. ""Fairness versus Welfare"" poses a bold challenge to contemporary moral philosophy by showing that most moral principles conflict more sharply with welfare than is generally recognized. In particular, the authors demonstrate that all principles that are not based exclusively on welfare will sometimes favour policies under which literally everyone would be worse off. The book draws on the work of moral philosophers, economists, evolutionary and cognitive psychologists, and legal academics to scrutinize a number of particular subjects that have engaged legal scholars and moral philosophers.;How can the deeply problematic nature of all nonwelfarist principles be reconciled with our moral instincts and intuitions that support them? The authors offer an explanation of the origins of our moral instincts and intuitions, developing ideas originally advanced by Hume and Sidgwick and more recently explored by psychologists and evolutionary theorists. Their analysis indicates that most moral principles that seem appealing, upon examination, have a functional explanation, one that does not justify their being accorded independent weight in the assessment of public policy.

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