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Wildy’s Book News

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Vol 23 No 4 April/May 2018

Book of the Month

Cover of Williams, Mortimer and Sunnucks: Executors, Administrators and Probate

Williams, Mortimer and Sunnucks: Executors, Administrators and Probate

Edited by: Alexander Learmonth, Charlotte Ford, Julia Clark, John Ross Martyn
Price: £295.00

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UK Public Holiday Monday 28th May

Wildy's will be closed on Monday 28th May, re-opening on Tuesday 29th.

Online book orders received during the time we are closed will be processed as soon as possible once we re-open on Tuesday.

As usual credit cards will not be charged until the order is processed and ready to despatch.

Any Sweet & Maxwell or Lexis eBook orders placed after 4pm on the Friday 25th May will not be processed until Tuesday May 29th. UK orders for other publishers will be processed as normal. All non-UK eBook orders will be processed on Tuesday May 29th.

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Jumping the Queue

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Mark KelmanWilliam Nelson Cromwwell Professor of law, Stanford Law School, USA, Gillian LesterProfessor of Law, University of California, USA

ISBN13: 9780674489097
ISBN: 0674489098
Published: February 1998
Publisher: Harvard University Press
Format: Hardback
Price: £56.95



This text weighs alternative conceptions of the equal opportunity principle through an empirical and ethical exploration of the Federal law that directs local school districts to award special educational opportunities to students who are classified as learning disabled (LD). Mark Kelman and Gillian Lester consider the degree to which students with learning disabilities (rather than merely slow learners, the socially disadvantaged, or even the gifted) are entitled to benefits that might well prove advantageous to their classmates, such as extra time to complete an exam or expensive, individually tailored educational programmes.;They examine the vexing question of how we should distribute extra educational funds: should we give them to those who have fewer material resources to begin with, to those who might benefit more than others from extra resources, or should we simply strive to create greater equality of outcome? The book exposes a growing conflict between those who want to distribute scarce resources on an individual basis to children who are in need whatever the reason, and those who seek to eliminate group inequalities.

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