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Vol 21 No 10 Oct/Nov 2016

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Domestic Deployment of the Armed Forces: Military Powers, Law and Human Rights

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ISBN13: 9780754673460
Published: September 2009
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing Ltd
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £95.00



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Until recently, internal use of the armed forces has been generally regarded by the public, as well as academic commentators, as conduct to be expected of a military or autocratic regime, not a democratic government. However, there is growing concern that the 'war on terror' is conditioning public opinion to accept the internal deployment of the armed forces, including for broader industrial and political purposes.

This book examines the national and international law, human rights and civil liberties issues involved in governments calling out troops to deal with civil unrest or terrorism. As the introduction of military call-out legislation has become an emerging global trend in the opening years of the 21st century, there is considerable and growing interest in the constitutional and related problems surrounding the deployment of military forces for domestic purposes, particularly in the 'war on terror'. This book examines the changes underway in six comparable countries: the United States, Canada, Britain, Germany, Japan and Australia, providing a review and analysis of this trend, including its implications for legal and political rights.

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Subjects:
Human Rights and Civil Liberties
Contents:
Preface
Introduction: why this book?
An international trend
The troubled historical record
United States: eroding protections against military intervention
Canada
making 'domestic security' a core mission
Britain: 'defend the state'
Germany and Italy: post-war restrictions under challenge
Japan: undermining the 'pacifist' clause
Australia: legislating military powers
Legal immunities and uncertainties
Wider legal, political and democratic implications
Bibliography
Index.