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Wildy’s Book News

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Vol 22 No 4 April/May 2017

Book of the Month

Cover of Whistleblowing: Law and Practice

Whistleblowing: Law and Practice

Price: £175.00

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Fish, Law, and Colonialism

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Douglas C. Harrisassistant professor in the faculty of law, University of British Columbia, Canada

ISBN13: 9780802084538
ISBN: 0802084532
Published: December 2001
Publisher: University of Toronto Press
Format: Paperback
Price: £26.99



Usually despatched in 1 to 3 weeks.

""Fish, Law, and Colonialism"" recounts the human conflict over fish and fishing in British Columbia and of how that conflict was shaped by law.;Pacific salmon fisheries, owned and managed by Aboriginal peoples, were transformed in the late 19th and early 20th centuries by commercial and sport fisheries backed by the Canadian state and its law. Through detailed case studies of the conflicts over fish weirs on the Cowichan and Babine rivers, Douglas Harris describes the evolving legal apparatus that dispossessed Aboriginal peoples of their fisheries. Building upon themes developed in literatures on state law and local custom, and law and colonialism, he examines the contested nature of the colonial encounter on the scale of a river. In doing so, Harris reveals the many divisions both within and between government departments, local settler societies, and Aboriginal communities.

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