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Vol 21 No 9 Sept/Oct 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Goode on Commercial Law

Goode on Commercial Law

Edited by: Ewan McKendrick
Price: £170.00

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Ruling by Statute: How Uncertainty and Vote Buying Shape Lawmaking

ISBN13: 9781107005655
Published: June 2011
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £69.99

Despatched in 7 to 9 days.

What are the main factors that allow presidents and prime ministers to enact policy through acts of government that carry the force of law? Or, simply put, when does a government actually govern? The theory presented in this book provides a major advance in our understanding of statutory policy making. Using a combination of an original analytical framework and statistical techniques, as well as historical and contemporary case studies, the book demonstrates that, contrary to conventional wisdom, variations in legislative passage rates are the consequences of differences in uncertainty, not partisan support. In particular, it shows that a chief executive's legislative success depends on the predictability of legislators' voting behavior and whether buying votes is a feasible option. From a normative standpoint, the book reveals that governability is best served when the opposition has realistic chances of occasionally defeating the executive in the legislative arena.

Constitutional and Administrative Law
Part I. Introduction
1. Introduction
Part II. Theoretical Foundations
2. On statutory policy making
3. A model of statutory policy making under uncertainty
Part III. Empirical Implications
4. Measuring chief executives' statutory performance
5. Patterns of statutory policy making around the world
6. Political prowess or 'lady luck'?
7. Buying legislators
8. Electoral rules and lawmaking
Part IV. Normative Implications
9. The political gap
Part V. Conclusions: 10. Conclusions.