Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 21 No 11 Nov/Dec 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Price: £99.95

Pupillage & Student Offers

Special Discounts for Pupils, Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


How Mass Atrocities End: Studies from Guatemala, Burundi, Indonesia, the Sudans, Bosnia-Herzegovina, and Iraq

Edited by: Bridget Conley-Zilkic

ISBN13: 9781107124370
Published: March 2016
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £69.99



This is a Print On Demand Title.
The publisher will print a copy to fulfill your order. Books can take between 1 to 3 weeks. Looseleaf titles between 1 to 2 weeks.

Given the brutality of mass atrocities, it is no wonder that one question dominates research and policy: what can we, who are not at risk, do to prevent such violence and hasten endings? But this question skips a more fundamental question for understanding the trajectory of violence: how do mass atrocities actually end?

This volume presents an analysis of the processes, decisions, and factors that help bring about the end of mass atrocities. It includes qualitatively rich case studies from Burundi, Guatemala, Indonesia, Sudan, Bosnia, and Iraq, drawing patterns from wide-ranging data. As such, it offers a much needed correction to the popular 'salvation narrative' framing mass atrocity in terms of good and evil.

The nuanced, multidisciplinary approach followed here represents not only an essential tool for scholars, but an important step forward in improving civilian protection.

Subjects:
Human Rights and Civil Liberties, International Criminal Law, Norway, Bosnia Herzegovina
Contents:
Introduction Bridget Conley-Zilkic
1. Guatemala: the persistence of genocidal logic beyond mass killing Roddy Brett
2. Burundi: the anatomy of mass violence endgames Noel Twagiramungu
3. Indonesia: why mass atrocity endings diverged in comparable civil wars Claire Smith
4. Sudan: patterns of violence and imperfect endings Alex de Waal
5. Bosnia-Herzegovina: endings real and imagined Bridget Conley-Zilkic
6. Iraq: atrocity as political capital Fanar Haddad.