Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 21 No 10 Oct/Nov 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Price: £99.95

Pupillage & Student Offers

Special Discounts for Pupils, Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


Disability and Information Technology: A Comparative Study in Media Regulation


ISBN13: 9781107502895
Published: March 2015
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Paperback (Hardback in 2013)
Price: £21.99
Hardback edition , ISBN13 9780521191616



Despatched in 6 to 8 days.

Disability and Information Technology examines the extent to which regulatory frameworks for information and communication technologies (ICTs) safeguard the rights of persons with disabilities as citizenship rights.

It adopts a comparative approach focused on four case studies: Canada, the European Union, the United Kingdom and the United States. It focuses on the tension between social and economic values in the regulation of ICTs and calls for a regulatory approach based on a framework of principles that reflects citizenship values. The analysis identifies challenges encountered in the jurisdictions examined and points toward the rights-based approach advanced by the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities as a benchmark in protecting the rights of persons with disabilities to have equal access to information.

The research draws on a wealth of resources, including legislation, cases, interviews, consultation documents and responses from organisations representing persons with disabilities.

Subjects:
Information Technology Law, Discrimination Law, Media and Entertainment Law
Contents:
1. The regulation of ICTs for the pursuit of citizenship rights
2. Case study: Canada
3. Case study: the European Union
4. Case study: the United Kingdom
5. Case study: the United States of America
6. Lessons to be learnt? Reflection on the case studies.