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Vol 21 No 9 Sept/Oct 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Goode on Commercial Law

Goode on Commercial Law

Edited by: Ewan McKendrick
Price: £170.00

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The Moral Challenge of Dangerous Climate Change: Values, Poverty, and Policy

ISBN13: 9781107678507
Published: June 2014
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Paperback
Price: £21.99
Hardback edition , ISBN13 9781107017306

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This book examines the threat that climate change poses to projects of poverty eradication, sustainable development, and biodiversity preservation. It discusses the values that support these projects and evaluates the normative bases of climate change policy. It regards climate change policy as a public problem that normative philosophy can shed light on and assumes that the development of policy should be based on values regarding what is important to respect, preserve, and protect. What sort of policy do we owe the poor of the world who are particularly vulnerable to climate change? Why should our generation take on the burden of mitigating climate change caused, in no small part, by emissions from people now dead? What value is lost when species go extinct, because of climate change? This book presents a broad and inclusive discussion of climate change policy, relevant to those with interests in public policy, development studies, environmental studies, political theory, and moral and political philosophy.

Environmental Law
1. Danger, poverty, and human dignity
2. The value of biodiversity
3. Risks, uncertainties, and precaution
4. Discounting and the future
5. The right to sustainable development
6. Responsibility and climate change policy
7. Policy and urgency
8. Frankenstorms

Appendix 1. The anti-poverty principle and the non-identity problem
Appendix 2. Climate change and the human rights of future persons: assessing four