Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 21 No 9 Sept/Oct 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Goode on Commercial Law

Goode on Commercial Law

Edited by: Ewan McKendrick
Price: £170.00

Pupillage & Student Offers

Special Discounts for Pupils, Newly Called & Students

Read More ...

Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online


Gender and Justice: Why Women in the Judiciary Really Matter (eBook)

Image not available ebook lge

ISBN13: 9781136332067
Published: August 2012
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Country of Publication: UK
Format: eBook (ePub)
Price: £20.13 + £4.03 VAT
The amount of VAT charged may change depending on your location of use.

Once the order is confirmed an automated e-mail will be sent to you to allow you to download the eBook.

All eBooks are supplied firm sale and cannot be returned. If you believe there is a fault with your eBook then contact us on ebooks@wildy.com and we will help in resolving the issue. This does not affect your statutory rights.

This eBook is available in the following formats: ePub.

In stock.
Need help with ebook formats?

Also available as

Intended for use in courses on law and society, as well as courses in women's and gender studies, women and politics, and women and the law, this book explores different questions in different North American and European geographical jurisdictions and courts, demonstrating the value of a gender analysis of courts, judges, law, institutions, organizations, and, ultimately, politics. Gender and Justice argues empirically for both more women and more feminists on the bench, while demonstrating that achieving these two aims are independent projects.

Image not available ebook lge
General Interest, eBooks
1. Introduction: Gender as a Social Process
2. Gender, Judging, and Difference
3. Mobilizing Emotions: The Case of Rosalie Wahl and the Minnesota Supreme Court
4. Strategic Partnerships and Women on the Federal Bench
5. Gender on the Agenda: Lessons from the United Kingdom
6. A Case for Representation: the European Court of Justice
7. Backlash Against Women Judges
8. Conclusion: Drawing on the History of Women's Exclusion from Juries to Make the Case for Women Judges