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Vol 21 No 9 Sept/Oct 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Goode on Commercial Law

Goode on Commercial Law

Edited by: Ewan McKendrick
Price: £170.00

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Referendums and the European Union: A Comparative Inquiry

ISBN13: 9781316603369
Published: June 2016
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Paperback (Hardback in 2014)
Price: £27.99
Hardback edition , ISBN13 9781107034044

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Why have referendums on European integration proliferated since the 1970s? How are referendums accommodated within member states' constitutional orders and with what impact on the European integration process?

What is the likely institutional impact of referendums on the future of the European integration process? Drawing on an interdisciplinary approach, these are just some of the fundamental questions addressed in this book.

The central thesis is that the EU is faced with a 'direct democratic dilemma', which is compounded by the EU's rigid constitutional structure and a growing politicisation of the referendum device on matters related to European integration.

Referendums and the European Union discusses how this dilemma has emerged to impact on the course of integration and how it can be addressed.

Constitutional and Administrative Law, EU Law
1. Direct democracy, referendums, and European integration: a conceptual framework
2. Constitutionally accommodating European integration: the role and impact of the referendum
3. Political dynamics around EU related referendums
4. EU institutional adaptation in the shadow of the extraterritorial referendum
5. Dilemmas of direct democracy: the EU from comparative perspective
6. Models of constitutional design
7. Conclusion.