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Vol 21 No 11 Nov/Dec 2016

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Promoting Law Student and Lawyer Well-Being in Australia and Beyond

Edited by: Colin James, James Duffy, Rachael Field

ISBN13: 9781472445292
Published: May 2016
Publisher: Ashgate Publishing Ltd
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £95.00




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£79.17
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University can be a psychologically distressing place for students. Empirical studies in Australia and the USA highlight that a large number of law students suffer from psychological distress, when compared to students from other disciplines and members of the general population.

This book explores the significant role that legal education can play in the promotion of mental health and well-being in law students, and consequently in the profession. The volume considers the ways in which the problems of psychological distress amongst law students are connected to the way law and legal culture are taught, and articulates curricula and extra-curricula strategies for promoting wellbeing for law students.

With contributions from legal academics, legal practitioners and psychologists, the authors discuss the possible causes of psychological distress in the legal community, and potential interventions that may increase psychological well-being. This important book will be of interest to legal academics, law students, members of the legal profession, post-graduate researchers as well as non-law researchers interested in this area.

Subjects:
Other Jurisdictions , General Interest, Australia
Contents:
Introduction
Valuing persons and communities in doing wellness for law well, Stephen Tang
Towards an integrated, whole-school approach to promoting law student wellbeing, Wendy Larcombe
The persistence of distress, Paula Baron
Law student lifestyle pressures, Alex Steel and Anna Huggins
The relationship between class participation and law students' learning, engagement and stress: do demographics matter?, Anna Huggins and Alex Steele
Vitality for life and law: fostering student resilience, empowerment and well-being at law school, Judith Marychurch
Resilience and wellbeing programs - the practical legal training experience, Judy Bourke and Maxine Evers
Resilient lawyers: maximising well-being in legal education and practice, Colin James
Using peer assisted learning to develop resilient and resourceful learners, Penelope Watson
On being, not just thinking like, a lawyer: connections between uncertainty, ignorance and wellbeing, Tony Foley and Stephen Tang
Balance and context - law student well-being and lessons from positive psychology, James Duffy
Connecting law students to health and wellbeing, Molly Townes-O'Brien
Contemplative practice in the law school: breaking barriers to learning and resilience, Prue Vines and Patricia Morgan
Harnessing the law curriculum to promote law student well-being, particularly in the first year of legal education, Rachael Field
Beyond the curriculum: the wellbeing of law students within their broader environment, Helen Stallman and James Duffy
Dealing with resistance to change by legal academics, Nick James
Index.