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Vol 21 No 11 Nov/Dec 2016

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Comparing the Democratic Governance of Police Intelligence: New Models of Participation and Expertise in the United States and Europe

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Edited by: Thierry Delpeuch, Jacqueline E. Ross

ISBN13: 9781785361029
Published: August 2016
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing Limited
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £70.00



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Gathering and analyzing of information is a responsibility that police intelligence units are thought to do in relative isolation. Intelligence work in the United States and Europe, however, has been significantly transformed in recent years into a more collaborative process that combines the police with a mix of outsiders to make the practice of acquiring and assessing information more democratic. This volume examines how this partnership paradigm has transformed the ways in which participants gather, analyze and use intelligence for security problems ranging from petty nuisances and violent crimes to urban riots, organized crime and terrorism.

The book’s expert contributors provide a comparative look at police intelligence by exploring how emerging collaborative ventures have reshaped the way police define and prioritize public safety concerns. The book compares local security partnerships in both centralized and decentralized systems, presenting an unparalleled discussion of police intelligence not only in the English-speaking world but also in countries like Germany and France, whose adoption of this collaborative paradigm has seldom been studied. Ultimately, this book provides a timely debate about the effectiveness of intelligence gathering tactics and the legitimacy of police tactics and related procedural justice concerns.

Because this book situates itself at the intersection of several disciplines, it will find an audience in multiple fields. Its diverse readership includes scholars and students of policing and security studies in law schools, criminal justice programs as well as political science and sociology departments. Other significant audiences will include professionals and researchers in comparative law, comparative criminal procedure, in addition to the study of law and society.

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Subjects:
Police and Public Order Law
Contents:
I. INTRODUCTION
1. Introduction: The Collaborative Analysis of Intelligence
Thierry Delpeuch and Jacqueline E. Ross

PART II NETWORKS OPEN TO PARTICIPANTS OUTSIDE OF LAW ENFORCEMENT: THE INFLUENCE OF LOCAL SECURITY PARTNERSHIPS ON INTELLIGENCE ANALYSIS
2. Beat Meetings, Responsiveness to the Community, and Police Effectiveness in Chicago
Wesley G. Skogan
3. The Joint Production of Intelligence in Local Security Partnerships: French Initiatives in Local Risk Management
Thierry Delpeuch, Renaud Epstein and Jacqueline Ross
4. Information as a Form of Democratic Participation in Policing: Some Critical Reflections on the Role and Use of Online Crime Maps in the United Kingdom
Anna Barker
5. The English and Welsh Experiment in Democratic Governance of Policing through Police and Crime Commissioners: a Misconceived Venture or a Good Idea, Badly Implemented?
Adam Crawford

PART III POLICE TACTICS, LEGITIMACY, AND INTELLIGENCE
6. Street Stops and Police Legitimacy in New York
Jeffrey A. Fagan, Tom Tyle andTracy T. Meares
7. Enhancing Effectiveness in Counterterrorism Policing
Stephen J. Schulhofer
8. Intelligence-led Policing and the Disruption of Organized Crime: Motifs, Methods and Morals
Nick Tilley
9. Democratic Policing: Case Working and Intelligence
Peter Manning
10. Governing the Police by Numbers: The French Experience
Jacques de Maillard and Christian Mouhanna
11. Cultural Profiling? Police Prevention and Minorities in Berlin
Jérémie Gauthier

PART IV “CLOSED”
PARTNERSHIPS OPEN ONLY TO LAW ENFORCEMENT PROFESSIONALS: INTERNATIONAL SECURITY NETWORKS
12. Within Transnational Policing Systems: integration and adaptation mechanisms used by foreign liaison officers deployed in Washington D.C
Frederic Lemieux and Chantal Perras
13. The Role of Trust for the Exchange of Police Information in the European Multilevel System
Hartmut Aden

PART V CONCLUSION
14. A Pluralist perspective on how the Police Make Sense of Crime, Disorder, and Their Own Work Environment
Thierry Delpeuch and Jacqueline E. Ross
Index