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Vol 23 No 8 Aug/Sept 18

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Foreign Relations Law

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Edited by: Curtis A. Bradley

ISBN13: 9781788115278
To be Published: February 2019
Publisher: Edward Elgar Publishing Limited
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback, 2 Volumes
Price: £505.00



This two-volume collection contains the leading modern literature on foreign relations law, providing a rich foundation and resource for researchers in this field. The topics addressed include the history of foreign relations law, the role of the courts in adjudicating foreign affairs disputes, executive power over foreign affairs, the domestic status of treaties, the phenomenon of executive agreements, the judicial application of customary international law, and the distribution of authority over war powers. By consolidating these articles and presenting them thematically, the collection allows for a unique birds-eye view of the entire field. Tied together with an introductory chapter by Professor Curtis Bradley, this collection promises to be an invaluable research tool for academics as well as a fascinating read for those interested in the subject.

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Subjects:
Public International Law
Contents:
Volume I
Contents:
Acknowledgments
Introduction Curtis A. Bradley
PART I HISTORY AND CONCEPTUALIZATION OF THE FIELD
1. G. Edward White (1999), ‘The Transformation of the Constitutional Regime of Foreign Relations’, Virginia Law Review, 85 (1), February,
2. Ganesh Sitaraman and Ingrid Wuerth (2015), ‘The Normalization of Foreign Relations Law’, Harvard Law Review, 128 (7), 1897–979
3. Curtis A. Bradley (2015), ‘Foreign Relations Law and the Purported Shift Away From “Exceptionalism”’, Harvard Law Review, 86 (2), March, 294–304
PART II ROLE OF THE COURTS AND DEFERENCE TO THE EXECUTIVE
4. Harold Hongju Koh (1988), ‘Why the President (Almost) Always Wins in Foreign Affairs: Lessons of the Iran-Contra Affair’, Yale Law Journal, 97 (7), June, 1255–1342
5. Eric A. Posner and Cass R. Sunstein (2007), ‘Chevronizing Foreign Relations Law’, Yale Law Journal, 116 (6), April, 1170–1228
6. Derek Jinks and Neal Kumar Katyal (2007), ‘Disregarding Foreign Relations Law’, Yale Law Journal, 116 (6), April, 1230–83
PART III EXECUTIVE POWER OVER FOREIGN AFFAIRS
7. Michael J. Glennon (1988), ‘Two Views of Presidential Foreign Affairs Power: Little v. Barreme or Curtis-Wright?’, Yale Journal of International Law, 13 (5), November, 5–20
8. Saikrishna B. Prakash and Michael D. Ramsey (2001), ‘The Executive Power over Foreign Affairs’, Yale Law Journal, 111 (2), November, 231–356
9. Curtis A. Bradley and Martin S. Flaherty (2004), ‘Executive Power Essentialism and Foreign Affairs’, Michigan Law Review, 102, February, 545–688
PART IV TREATIES IN DOMESTIC LAW
10. Carlos Manuel Vázquez (1995), ‘The Four Doctrines of Self-Executing Treaties’, American Journal of International Law, 89 (4), February, 695–723
11. Curtis A. Bradley (2008), ‘Self-Execution and Treaty Duality’, Supreme Court Review, 1, 131–82 [52]
Index

Volume II
Contents:
Acknowledgements
Introduction An introduction to both volumes by the editor appears in Volume I
PART I TREATIES AND FEDERALISM
1. Curtis A. Bradley (1998), ‘The Treaty Power and American Federalism’, Michigan Law Review, 97, 390–461
2. Duncan B. Hollis (2006), ‘Executive Federalism: Forging New Federalist Constraints on the Treaty Power’, Southern California Law Review, 79, April, 1327–95
PART II EXECUTIVE AGREEMENTS
3. Bruce Ackerman and David Golove (1995), ‘Is NAFTA Constitutional?’, Harvard Law Review, 108 (4), February, 799–929
4. Oona A. Hathaway (2008), ‘Treaties’ End: The Past, Present, and Future of International Lawmaking in the United States’, Yale Law Journal, 117, April, 1236–1372
PART III CUSTOMARY INTERNATIONAL LAW IN THE U.S. LEGAL SYSTEM
5. Curtis A. Bradley and Jack L. Goldsmith (1997), ‘Customary International Law As Federal Common Law: A Critique of The Modern Position’, Harvard Law Review, 110 (4), February, 815–76
6. Harold Hongju Koh (1998), ‘Is International Law Really State Law?’, Harvard Law Review, 111 (7), May, 1824–61
7. Curtis A. Bradley and Jack L. Goldsmith (1998), ‘Federal Courts and The Incorporation of International Law’, Harvard Law Review, 111 (8), June, 2260–75
PART IV WAR POWERS
8. John Hart Ely (1988), ‘Suppose Congress Wanted a War Powers Act That Worked’, Columbia Law Review, 88 (7), 1379–1431
9. John C. Yoo (1996), ‘The Continuation of Politics by Other Means: The Original Understanding of War Powers’, California Law Review, 84 (2), March, 167–305
10. Michael D. Ramsey (2002), ‘Textualism and War Powers’, University of Chicago Law Review, 69, October, 1543–1638
Index