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Vol 21 No 9 Sept/Oct 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Goode on Commercial Law

Goode on Commercial Law

Edited by: Ewan McKendrick
Price: £170.00

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Regulating Municipal Water Supply Concessions: Accountability in Transitional China

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ISBN13: 9783662436820
Published: July 2014
Publisher: Springer-Verlag
Country of Publication: Germany
Format: Hardback
Price: £90.00

This is a Print On Demand Title.
The publisher will print a copy to fulfill your order. Books can take between 1 to 3 weeks. Looseleaf titles between 1 to 2 weeks.

This book discusses the recently introduced concession policy, which is also known as PPP worldwide, on municipal utilities policy in China. In this context, critics have claimed that there is a gap in accountability with regard to concessions. The author utilizes interdisciplinary methods and comparative studies, taking into account the situation in the EU and US to analyze the accountability gap some feel will be created when the policy is implemented. Taking water sector concessions as the subject of discussion, the author distinguishes between three types of accountability: traditional bureaucratic accountability, legal accountability and public accountability. By systematically analyzing the essential problems involved, the book attempts to achieve a better understanding of concession and its application in the context of public utilities and finds that the alleged accountability gap is attributed to traditional bureaucratic accountability in China and the concession system per se.

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Other Jurisdictions , China
Concession Overview and Accountability Gap in China
Restricted Competition in Concessions and Concessionaire Selections
Water Pricing Regulations in the Context Of Concessions
Concession Contracts and Legal Accountability
Regulatory Agencies and Structures under Concessions
Conclusions and Implications.