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Vol 22 No 4 April/May 2017

Book of the Month

Cover of Whistleblowing: Law and Practice

Whistleblowing: Law and Practice

Price: £175.00

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The Laws of Late Medieval Italy (1000-1500) : Foundations for a European Legal System


ISBN13: 9789004211865
Published: August 2013
Publisher: Brill Academic Publishers
Country of Publication: The Netherlands
Format: Hardback
Price: £130.00



Usually despatched in 1 to 3 weeks.

In The Laws of Late Medieval Italy Mario Ascheri examines the features of the Italian legal world and explains why it should be regarded as a foundation for the future European continental system.

The deep feuds among the Empire, the Churches unified by Roman papacy and the flourishing cities gave rise to very new legal ideas with the strong cooperation of the universities, beginning with that of Bologna. The teaching of Roman law and of the new papal laws, which quickly spread all over Europe, built up a professional group of lawyers and notaries which shaped the new, 'modern', public institutions, including efficient courts (like the Inquisition).

Politically divided, Italy was partly unified by the legal system, so-called (Continental) common law (ius commune), which became a pattern for all of Europe onwards.

Early modern Europe had for long time to work with it, and parts of it are still alive as a common cultural heritage behind a new European law system.