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The Rent Acts 11th ed Volume 1 only: Text

Edited by: John Stuart Colyer, Robert Megarry, Robert Reid, James Muir Watt, Lindsay Megarry

ISBN13: 9780420448408
ISBN: 0420448403
Previous Edition ISBN: 004735
Published: September 1988
Publisher: Stevens & Sons Ltd
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: Out of print



Out of Print

  • Volumes 1 & 2, published 1988
  • Volume 3 published 1989 (Sold Seperately)
  • 3rd Cumulative Supplement 1993 (Sold Seperately)

    Practitioners and courts alike have long regarded Megarry as the standard work on the Rent Acts. The treatment of the law relating to tenancies still subject to the Rent Acts, with linking references, makes it possible to read the explanatory comment in Volume 1 (Text) side by side with the text of the statutes, new and old, in Volume 2 (Statutes). In this way, many of the advantages of annotated statutes are gained but not at the expense of a well laid out text-book.

    Since the last edition there have been massive and detailed clanges in the statute law, and hundreds of reported decisions in the English courts. These are treated exhaustively. In addition, the book draws on transcripts of many unreported decisions of the Court of Appeal and Queen's Bench Divisional Court, as well as a number of decisions in Scotland and other jurisdictions.

    The greatest expansion in coverage in the initial two volumes has been in those parts that deal with fair rents, rent officers and rent assessment committees. Yet despite covering such a complex subject so comprehensively, these two volumes fully maintain the book's tradition of clarity, both in the detailed statement of the law and in the organisation and sub-division of the text.