(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Book of the Month

Cover of Retained EU Law: A Practical Guide

Retained EU Law: A Practical Guide

Price: £65.00

Wildy, Simmonds & Hill

Just Published

The Complete List...


Offers for Newly Called Barristers & Students

Special Discounts for Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


Maritime Delimitation as a Judicial Process


ISBN13: 9781108740050
Published: November 2020
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Paperback (Hardback in 2019)
Price: £27.99
Hardback edition , ISBN13 9781108497398



This is a Print On Demand Title.
The publisher will print a copy to fulfill your order. Books can take between 1 to 3 weeks. Looseleaf titles between 1 to 2 weeks.

Maritime Delimitation as a Judicial Process is the first comprehensive analysis of judicial decisions, state practice and academic opinions on maritime boundary delimitation. For ease of reading and clarity, it follows this three-stage approach in its structure. Massimo Lando analyses the interaction between international tribunals and states in the development of the delimitation process, in order to explain rationally how a judicially-created approach to delimit maritime boundaries has been accepted by states.

Pursuing a practical approach, this book identifies disputed points in maritime delimitation and proposes solutions which could be applied in future judicial disputes. In addition, the book engages with the underlying theories of maritime delimitation, including the relationship between delimitation and delineation, the effect of third states' rights on delimitation, and the manner in which each stage of the process influences the other stages.

Subjects:
Shipping, Transport and Maritime Law
Contents:
Figures
Foreword
Preface
Table of cases
Table of treaties and legislation
Abbreviations
1. Maritime delimitation in the time of international tribunals
2. Historical and conceptual framework
3. Relevant coast and relevant area
4. Equidistance
5. Relevant circumstances
6. Disproportionality
7. States, international tribunals and the delimitation process
Appendix 1
Appendix 2
Bibliography
Index