Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 22 No 4 April/May 2017

Book of the Month

Cover of Whistleblowing: Law and Practice

Whistleblowing: Law and Practice

Price: £175.00

Pupillage & Student Offers

Special Discounts for Pupils, Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


UK Public Holiday May 2017

Wildy's will be closed on Monday 29th May and will re-open on Tuesday 30th May.

Online book orders received during the time we are closed will be processed as soon as possible once we re-open on Tuesday.

As usual Credit Cards will not be charged until the order is processed and ready to despatch.

Any non-UK eBook orders placed after 5pm on the Friday 26th May will not be processed until Tuesday 30th May. UK eBook orders will be processed as normal.

Hide this message

Justice as Fittingness

Image not available lge
Geoffrey CupitLecturer, Department of Political Science and Public Policy, University of Waikato, New Zealand

ISBN13: 9780198239017
ISBN: 0198239017
Published: December 1996
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Format: Hardback
Price: Out of print



In this text, the author puts forward an original theory of the nature of justice. He maintains that injustice is to be understood as a form of unfitting treatment - typically the treatment of people as less than they are. Justice is therefore closely related to unjustified contempt and disrespect, and ultimately to desert. He offers a closely argued discussion of what is at issue when people take differing views on what justice requires. He demonstrates that the language of desert provides a suitable idiom in which to address substantive questions of justice, and shows why acting justly may require respect for differing entitlement, contributions, and needs.;In the course of the book many important issues in moral and political philosophy are illuminated. Cupit offers a fresh account of the nature of the obligation to keep a promise, explains how requests can generate reasons for action, and suggests a radically new approach to solving the problem of political obligation.

Image not available lge