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Vol 21 No 11 Nov/Dec 2016

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Norms Without the Great Powers: International Law and Changing Social Expectations in World Politics


ISBN13: 9780198789871
To be Published: January 2017
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £60.00



Norms Without the Great Powers examines the nature of power in world politics, and the particular role that law plays in defining the meaning and deployment of power in the international system. Specifically, it seeks to further explicate the social dimensions of power as the capacity to shape how actors think about the world, in contrast to the more typical conception emphasizing material properties such as military or economic capabilities. Participating in international institutions and being seen as 'law-abiding' is a potent source of status for states and non-state actors alike. In engaging with the law, actors are inducted into a complex set of collective expectations that profoundly shape the way they frame their interests and pursue their policy goals. This process is first examined theoretically, and then through a detailed evaluation of two prominent-and challenging-multilateral institutions, the ban on antipersonnel mines and the International Criminal Court.

Subjects:
Public International Law
Contents:
1: Introduction: Non-Great Power Treaties in International Relations
2: A Social Theory of Treaty Influence
3: Assessing Treaty Impact
4: Building a Community of Law: State Parties and the Antipersonnel Mine Ban Treaty
5: Informal Adaptation: Non-Parties and the Antipersonnel Mine Ban Treat
6: State Parties and the ICC
7: Non-Parties and the ICC
8: Lessons from the Cases
9: Conclusion: Towards a Research Agenda on Non-Great Power Institutions
Appendix: List of Interviewees cited in the text