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Vol 21 No 10 Oct/Nov 2016

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Cover of Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

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Remedies and the WTO Agreement

Publication abandoned lge

ISBN13: 9780199268764
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: Publication Abandoned



This volume reviews and assesses the legal remedies available under the WTO Agreement. It examines these remedies in light of reparative and punitive theories of justice, and concludes that WTO remedies are distinct because they seek principally to achieve compliance with the WTO Agreement. They do so principally by identifying a violation and leaving it to the parties to negotiate a settlement.

The aim is neither to correct the injury, nor to punish the wrongdoer; but to create a new legal situation in which the wrong is unlikely to recur. WTO remedies are therefore akin to the declarative relief traditionally granted in public international law and domestic public law. A the same time, they pose a challenge to a developing international legal system that is increasingly oriented towards corrective and punitive justice.

This is the first comprehensive text offering a complete review of remedial law and practice under the WTO Agreement. It provides comparisons of WTO law and its remedies and results with public international law, European, and domestic public law. It is highly relevant to lawyers, academics, and government officials seeking an explanation of what WTO dispute settlement actually achieves.

Publication abandoned lge
Subjects:
International Trade
Contents:
I. Introduction
II. Remedies and the Law
III. Remedies in International Law
IV. Remedies and GATT
V. Remedies and the WTO Agreement: Legal Aspects
VI. Remedies and the WTO Agreement: Practice
VII. Remedies in other Systems of International Economic Law
VIII. Conclusion