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Vol 21 No 11 Nov/Dec 2016

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Religion, Law and Tradition

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Andrew HuxleySOAS, University of London

ISBN13: 9780700716890
ISBN: 0700716890
Published: May 2002
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
Format: Hardback
Price: £110.00



What are the similarities and differences between Jewish, Canon, Islamic, Chinese, Hindu and Buddhist law? These so-called 'religious laws' apply to over half the world's population. Do they, as comparative lawyers have assumed, form a coherent group that can be contrasted with the 'secular laws' of European states? The contributors to this volume agree that they do not. The seven chapters devoted to each 'religious law' explain why not. The remaining chapters offer new legal taxonomies, and new approaches to comparing the world's legal systems. This book brings together two scholarly traditions: experts in Roman, Jewish and Islamic law, an area where scholars tend to be familiar with work in each area, and experts in the legal traditions of South and East Asia, which have tended to be less interdisciplinary. The resulting mix produces new ways of looking at comparative law and legal history from a global perspective, and these essays contribute both to our understanding of comparative religion as well as comparative law.

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Contents:
Introduction Andrew Huxley Chapter 1. Judaism Bernard Jackson Chapter 2. Religious claims about Biblical Law Calum Carmichael Chapter 3. Canon Law Silvio Ferrari Chapter 4. Islam Lynn Welchman & Ian Edge Chapter 5. Hinduism: Once religious, always religious? Werner Menski Chapter 6. Buddhist Law Andrew Huxley Chapter 7. Law and religion in Han China Randall Peerenboom Chapter 8. Jewish and Roman Philosophies of Law David Daube Chapter 9. Religious systems Jacques Vanderlinden