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Vol 23 No 4 April/May 2018

Book of the Month

Cover of Williams, Mortimer and Sunnucks: Executors, Administrators and Probate

Williams, Mortimer and Sunnucks: Executors, Administrators and Probate

Edited by: Alexander Learmonth, Charlotte Ford, Julia Clark, John Ross Martyn
Price: £295.00

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UK Public Holiday Monday 28th May

Wildy's will be closed on Monday 28th May, re-opening on Tuesday 29th.

Online book orders received during the time we are closed will be processed as soon as possible once we re-open on Tuesday.

As usual credit cards will not be charged until the order is processed and ready to despatch.

Any Sweet & Maxwell or Lexis eBook orders placed after 4pm on the Friday 25th May will not be processed until Tuesday May 29th. UK orders for other publishers will be processed as normal. All non-UK eBook orders will be processed on Tuesday May 29th.

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Science, Colonialism, and Indigenous Peoples: The Cultural Politics of Law and Knowledge


ISBN13: 9781107675070
Published: May 2014
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Paperback
Price: £23.99



Despatched in 7 to 9 days.

At the intersection of indigenous studies, science studies, and legal studies lies a tense web of political issues of vital concern for the survival of indigenous nations. Numerous historians of science have documented the vital role of late-eighteenth- and nineteenth-century science as a part of statecraft, a means of extending empire. This book follows imperialism into the present, demonstrating how pursuit of knowledge of the natural world impacts, and is impacted by, indigenous peoples rather than nation-states. In extractive biocolonialism, the valued genetic resources, and associated agricultural and medicinal knowledge, of indigenous peoples are sought, legally converted into private intellectual property, transformed into commodities, and then placed for sale in genetic marketplaces. Science, Colonialism, and Indigenous Peoples critically examines these developments, demonstrating how contemporary relations between indigenous and Western knowledge systems continue to be shaped by the dynamics of power, the politics of property, and the apologetics of law.

Contents:
Part I. Biocolonialism as Imperial Science:
1. Imperialism then and now
2. Indigenous knowledge, power and responsibilities
3. Value-neutrality and value-bifurcation: the cultural politics of science

Part II. The Human Genome Diversity Project: A Case Study:
4. The rhetoric of research justification
5. Indigenist critiques of biocolonialism

Part III. Legitimation: The Rule and Role of Law:
6. The commodification of knowledge
7. Intellectual property rights as means and mechanism of imperialism
8. Transforming sovereignties

Conclusions: The politics of knowledge: resistance and recovery.