Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 21 No 11 Nov/Dec 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

Price: £99.95

Pupillage & Student Offers

Special Discounts for Pupils, Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


World Trade Law After Neoliberalism: Reimagining the Global Economic Order


ISBN13: 9780199592647
Published: September 2011
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £72.00
Paperback edition , ISBN13 9780199674398



Despatched in 4 to 6 days.

The rise of economic liberalism in the latter stages of the 20th century coincided with a fundamental transformation of international economic governance, especially through the law of the World Trade Organization.

In this book, Andrew Lang provides a new account of this transformation, and considers its enduring implications for international law. Against the commonly-held idea that 'neoliberal' policy prescriptions were encoded into WTO law, Lang argues that the last decades of the 20th century saw a reinvention of the international trade regime, and a reconstitution of its internal structures of knowledge.

In addition, the book explores the way that resistance to economic liberalism was expressed and articulated over the same period in other areas of international law, most prominently international human rights law. It considers the promise and limitations of this form of 'inter-regime' contestation, arguing that measures to ensure greater collaboration and cooperation between regimes may fail in their objectives if they are not accompanied by a simultaneous destabilization of each regime's structures of knowledge and characteristic features.

With that in mind, the book contributes to a full and productive contestation of the nature and purpose of global economic governance.

Subjects:
International Trade
Contents:
1: Introduction
Regime encounters: trade and human rights
2: Trade and Human Rights in Historical Perspective
3: The Global Justice Movement
4: Inter-regime Contestation
5: The Limits of Coherence
The trade regime and the neoliberal turn
6: Against Objectivism
7: Embedded Liberalism and Purposive Law
8: Neoliberalism and the Formal-technical Turn
9: Trade in Services
Conclusion
10: Conclusion: After Neoliberalism?