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Vol 21 No 11 Nov/Dec 2016

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Indigenous People, Crime and Punishment


ISBN13: 9780415831598
Published: June 2015
Publisher: Routledge
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Paperback (Hardback in 2013)
Price: £29.99
Hardback edition , ISBN13 9780415668446



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Indigenous People, Crime and Punishment examines criminal sentencing courts’ changing characterisations of Indigenous peoples’ identity, culture and postcolonial status. Focusing largely on Australian Indigenous peoples, but referring also to the Canadian and New Zealand experiences, Thalia Anthony critically analyzes how the judiciary have interpreted Indigenous difference.

Through an analysis of Indigenous sentencing decisions and remarks over a fifty year period in a number of jurisdictions, the book demonstrates how discretion is moulded to cultural assumptions about Indigeneity. More specifically, Indigenous People, Crime and Punishment shows how the increasing demonisation of Indigenous criminality and culture in sentencing has turned earlier ‘gains’ in the legal recognition of Indigenous peoples on their head. The recognition of Indigenous difference is thereby revealed as a pliable concept that is just as likely to remove rights as it is to grant them.

Subjects:
Criminology
Contents:
Introduction: Re-imagining the Indigenous criminal
Chapter One: Control metaphors in Indigenous sentencing
Chapter Two: Colonial and postcolonial Indigenous punishment
Chapter Four: Sentencing away culture and customary marriage
Chapter Five: Traditional Punishment in the New Punitiveness
Chapter Six: Sentencing ‘disadvantaged alcoholics’
Chapter Seven: Sentencing Indigenous resisters as if the racism never occurred
Conclusion/Epilogue: Burgeoning control metaphors in sentencing