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Vol 21 No 11 Nov/Dec 2016

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The Rule of Law in the Arab World: Courts in Egypt and the Gulf

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Nathan J. BrownGeorge Washington University, Washington DC

ISBN13: 9780521030687
Published: February 2007
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Paperback reissue
Price: £44.99
Hardback edition price on application, ISBN13 9780521590266



This is a Print On Demand Title.
The publisher will print a copy to fulfill your order. Books can take between 1 to 3 weeks. Looseleaf titles between 1 to 2 weeks.

Nathan Brown’s penetrating account of the development and operation of the courts in the Arab world is based on fieldwork in Egypt and the Gulf. The book addresses several important questions. Why, for example, did Egypt’s political leaders construct an independent judicial system that limited their own authority? And why does such a system appeal to Arab rulers outside Egypt? While most accounts stress the role of imperialism or liberal ideology, the author maintains that the primary purpose of the system is to provide support for the officially sanctioned order. The model offers similar attractions for other Arab rulers. From the theoretical perspective, the book will contribute to the debates about liberal legality, political change and the relationship between law and society in the developing world. It will be read by scholars of the Middle East, law students and those interested in the history of law and its evolution.

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Subjects:
Islamic Law
Contents:
Preface; Glossary; 1. Arab courts in comparative perspective; 2. The creation and operation of the modern Egyptian legal system, 1876–1937; 3. Egyptian courts, 1937–1971: centralization, authoritarianism and socialism; 4. Egyptian courts, 1971–1996: the re-emergence of liberal legality; 5. Legal reform in the Arab states of the Gulf; 6. The legal system and the rule of law in Kuwait and Qatar; 7. Popular uses of the courts; 8. Business and the courts; Conclusion; Bibliography; Index.