Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 21 No 9 Sept/Oct 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Goode on Commercial Law

Goode on Commercial Law

Edited by: Ewan McKendrick
Price: £170.00

Pupillage & Student Offers

Special Discounts for Pupils, Newly Called & Students

Read More ...

Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online


Legislative Deferrals: Statutory Ambiguity, Judicial Power, and American Democracy

ISBN13: 9780521168700
Published: September 2010
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: USA
Format: Hardback
Price: £29.99

This is a Print On Demand Title.
The publisher will print a copy to fulfill your order. Books can take between 1 to 3 weeks. Looseleaf titles between 1 to 2 weeks.

Why do unelected federal judges have so much power to make policy in the United States? Why were federal judges able to thwart apparent legislative victories won by labor organizations in the Lochner era? Most scholars who have addressed such questions assume that the answer lies in the judiciary's constitutionally guaranteed independence, and thus worry that insulated judges threaten democracy when they stray from baseline positions chosen by legislators. Originally published in 2003, this book argues for a fundamental shift in the way scholars think about judicial policy-making. Scholars need to notice that legislators also empower judges to make policy as a means of escaping accountability. This study of legislative deference to the courts offers a dramatic reinterpretation of the history of twentieth-century labor law and shows how attention to legislative deferrals can help scholars to address vexing questions about the consequences of judicial power in a democracy.

Other Jurisdictions , USA
1. Rethinking judicial policy making in a separation of powers system
2. False victories: labor, congress, and the courts, 1898–1935
3. 'As harmless as an infant': the Erdman Act in Congress and the courts
4. Killing with kindness: legislative ambiguity, judicial policy making, and the Clayton Act
5. The Norris-LaGuardia Act, for once: learning what to learn from the past
6. Legislative deferrals and judicial policy making in the administrative state: a brief look at the Wagner Act
7. Conclusion
Reference list