Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778
enquiries@wildy.com

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 23 No 4 April/May 2018

Book of the Month

Cover of Williams, Mortimer and Sunnucks: Executors, Administrators and Probate

Williams, Mortimer and Sunnucks: Executors, Administrators and Probate

Edited by: Alexander Learmonth, Charlotte Ford, Julia Clark, John Ross Martyn
Price: £295.00

Offers for Newly Called Barristers & Students

Special Discounts for Newly Called & Students

Read More ...


Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online

Read More...


Lowe legislation jp
Sealy millman 2018 jp
Desmith out now
Uk supremem 1 8
Williams published
Luba housing

UK Public Holiday Monday 28th May

Wildy's will be closed on Monday 28th May, re-opening on Tuesday 29th.

Online book orders received during the time we are closed will be processed as soon as possible once we re-open on Tuesday.

As usual credit cards will not be charged until the order is processed and ready to despatch.

Any Sweet & Maxwell or Lexis eBook orders placed after 4pm on the Friday 25th May will not be processed until Tuesday May 29th. UK orders for other publishers will be processed as normal. All non-UK eBook orders will be processed on Tuesday May 29th.

Hide this message

Law and Empire in Late Antiquity New ed

Image not available lge
Jill HarriesUniversity of St Andrews, Scotland

ISBN13: 9780521422734
ISBN: 0521422736
Published: November 2001
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Paperback
Price: £30.99



Despatched in 6 to 8 days.

This is the first systematic treatment in English by an historian of the nature, aims and efficacy of public law in late imperial Roman society from the third to the fifth century AD. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach, and using the writings of lawyers and legal anthropologists, as well as those of historians, the book offers new interpretations of central questions: What was the law of late antiquity? How efficacious was late Roman law? What were contemporary attitudes to pain, and the function of punishment? Was the judicial system corrupt? How were disputes settled? Law is analysed as an evolving discipline, within a framework of principles by which even the emperor was bound. While law, through its language, was an expression of imperial power, it was also a means of communication between emperor and subject, and was used by citizens, poor as well as rich, to serve their own ends.

Image not available lge
Subjects:
Roman Law and Greek Law
Contents:
1. The law of Late Antiquity
2. Making the law
3. The construction of authority
4. The efficacy of law
5. In court
6. Crime and the problem of pain
7. Punishment
8. The corrupt judge
9. Dispute settlement I: out of court
10. Dispute settlement II: episcopalis audientia
Conclusion.