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Vol 21 No 9 Sept/Oct 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Goode on Commercial Law

Goode on Commercial Law

Edited by: Ewan McKendrick
Price: £170.00

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Righteous Anger at the Wicked States: The Meaning of the Founders' Constitution

ISBN13: 9780521757522
Published: May 2009
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Paperback Reissue
Price: £29.99
Hardback edition , ISBN13 9780521852326

Despatched in 7 to 9 days.

This book is a history that explains the adoption of the US Constitution in terms of what the proponents of the Constitution were trying to accomplish. The Constitution was a revolutionary document replacing the confederation mode with a complete three-part national government supreme over the states. The most pressing need was to allow the federal government to tax, to pay off the Revolutionary War debts because in the next war, the United States would need to borrow again. The taxes needed to restore the public credit proved to be quite modest, however, and the Constitution went far beyond the immediate fiscal needs. This book argues that the proponents’ anger at the states for their recurring breaches of duty to the united cause explains both critical steps and the driving impetus for the revolution. Other issues were less important.

• Federalism is the most important current issue in Constitutional Law for the Supreme Court, making this interesting reading for all those interested in US Constitutional Law • This book explains that the US Constitution was adopted as an anti-state program and because of anger at the states • Researched original documents made available from the Library of Congress digital archive

Other Jurisdictions , USA
Part I. The Necessity of the Constitution: 1. The rise of the righteous anger; 2. Madison’s vision: requisitions and rights; 3. The superiority of the extended republic; 4. Shifting the foundations of government from the states to the people; 5. Partial losses; 6. Anti-federalism; 7. False issues
Part II. Less Convincing Factors: 8. The modesty of the original commerce clause; 9. Creditors, territories, and shaysites; 10. Hamilton’s constitution; 11. The turning of Madison; Concluding summary; Acknowledgments.