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Wildy’s Book News

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Vol 23 No 11 Nov/Dec 2018

Book of the Month

Cover of Paget's Law of Banking

Paget's Law of Banking

Edited by: John Odgers, Pagets
Price: £559.99

Offers for Newly Called Barristers & Students

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Christmas and New Year Opening Hours 2018/19

Christmas and New Year Opening Hours 2018/19



Wildy’s will have slightly different Opening Hours for 2018/19. The Lincoln’s Inn branch will close from Saturday 22nd December until Thursday 3rd January. Our Fleet Street branch will close from Friday 21st December until Wednesday 2nd January.



All Online book orders taken during the time we are closed will be processed at Lincoln’s Inn once we re-open on January 3rd. Credit Cards will NOT be charged until the order is ready to dispatch. .



During the time we are closed UK eBook orders will be processed automatically, Sweet & Maxwell and LexisNexis titles excepted and they, along with any non-UK eBook orders placed after 3pm on the 22nd December will not be processed until the 3rd January.

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Judicial Power and Canadian Democracy

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ISBN13: 9780773521315
ISBN: 0773521313
Published: March 2001
Publisher: McGill-Queen's University Press
Format: Hardback
Price: Out of print



The role the courts should play in Canada's political system is a long-simmering issue. Ever since the Charter of Rights and Freedoms came into effect in 1982, Canada's courts have been empowered to strike down any legislation held to contravene Canadians' basic rights. While any number of court rulings since that time have caused a stir in legal political circles, in the past several years judicial decisions have attracted the attention of a broader public. Landmark rulings on a range of controversial issues, from aboriginal claims to gay rights, have captured the headlines and catalyzed public debate over the merits of judicial power.;The controversy raises challenging questions about the role of a powerful judiciary in a democracy. In ""Judicial Power and Canadian Democracy"", a series of essays commissioned by the Institute for Research on Public Policy, some of Canada's foremost commentators - academics, politicians, and Supreme Court judges themselves - take up the debate. Some tangle over the pivotal question: should judges have the decisive say on issues involving entrenched rights that have profound implication for the policy preferences of elected bodies? Others examine related issues, including Supreme Court appointment procedures, interest group litigation, the historical roots of the notwithstanding clause, and the state of public opinion on Canada's courts.;Those interested in the power of the judicial branch should find much in this collection to stimulate fresh thinking on issues that are likely to remain on the public agenda for years to come.

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