Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 21 No 9 Sept/Oct 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Goode on Commercial Law

Goode on Commercial Law

Edited by: Ewan McKendrick
Price: £170.00

Pupillage & Student Offers

Special Discounts for Pupils, Newly Called & Students

Read More ...

Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online


Public Services and International Trade Liberalization: Human Rights and Gender Implications

ISBN13: 9781107026568
Published: November 2012
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £74.99
Paperback edition , ISBN13 9781107471177

Despatched in 7 to 9 days.

Does public service liberalization pose a threat to gender and human rights? Traditionally considered essential services provided by a state to its citizens, public services are often viewed as public goods which embody social values.

Subjecting them to market ideology thus raises concerns that the intrinsic social nature of these services will be negated. Moreover, as those most likely to be reliant on public services, public service liberalization may also further marginalize women. Nevertheless, states continue to increasingly liberalize public services.

Barnali Choudhury explores the implications of public service liberalization. Using primarily a legal approach, but drawing from case studies, empirical research and gender theories, she examines whether liberalization under the General Agreement on Trade in Services and other liberalization vehicles such as preferential trade and investment agreements compromise human rights and gender objectives.

Human Rights and Civil Liberties, International Trade

Part I. Foundations:
1. International economic law and human rights
2. Public services
3. Instruments for liberalizing public services

Part II. Human Rights and Gendered Implications of Liberalization of Public Services:
4. Liberalization of water services
5. Liberalization of educational services
6. Liberalization of health services
7. Accounting for the differential implications of liberalized public services on developing countries and women

Part III. The Future of Liberalization of Public Services:
9. Should public services continue to be liberalized?
10. Conclusion.