Wildy logo
(020) 7242 5778

Wildy’s Book News

Book News cover photo

Vol 21 No 9 Sept/Oct 2016

Book of the Month

Cover of Goode on Commercial Law

Goode on Commercial Law

Edited by: Ewan McKendrick
Price: £170.00

Pupillage & Student Offers

Special Discounts for Pupils, Newly Called & Students

Read More ...

Secondhand & Out of Print

Browse Secondhand Online


Law and History

Image not available lge
Edited by: Norman Doe, Russell Sandberg

ISBN13: 9781138961685
To be Published: November 2016
Publisher: Routledge
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback, 4 Volumes
Price: £900.00

The historical study of law is among the most important domains of global legal scholarship. Indeed, many of the most distinguished academic works on law are historical. And while much scholarly output has focused on ‘textual’ legal history—exploring how legal doctrines, ideas, concepts, principles, and institutions have developed over time—in recent years there has also been a sharpened focus on ‘contextual’ legal history, exploring the interaction and interplay between legal and socio-political change.

Now, to help researchers and students navigate and make better sense of an overabundance of scholarship, Routledge announces a new collection in its Critical Concepts in Law series. Edited by two leading academics, Law and History provides an authoritative ‘mini library’ which explores the development of legal history as an area of study by bringing together major works on the ‘textual’ legal history of English law alongside cutting-edge ‘contextual’ legal history.

Volume I, entitled ‘Historiography’, explores the relationship between law and history and the development of legal history. The second and third volumes ('Public Law’and 'Land Law’ ) explicate law’s historical development, while the collection’s final volume, ‘Law of Obligations', underscores the interaction between legal and social and political change.

With a full index, and thoughtful introductions, newly written by the learned editors, Law and History is sure to be welcomed as a vital and enduring reference and pedagogical resource.

Image not available lge
Legal History
Volume 1: Historiography

Norman Doe and Russell Sandberg, ‘Textual and Contextual Legal History’.
1.J Phillips, ‘Why Legal History Matters’ (2010) 41 Victoria University of Wellington Law Review 293-316.
2.DIbbetson, ‘What is Legal History a History of’ in A Lewis and M Lobban (ed), Law and History (Oxford University Press, 2004) 33-40.
3.M Lobban, ‘Sociology, History and the "Internal" Study of Law’ in R Nobles and D Schiff (eds) Law, Society and Community: Socio-Legal Essays in Honour of Roger Cotterrell (Ashgate, 2014) 39-60
4.R M Jarvis, P G Coleman and G L Richmond, ‘Contextual Thinking: Why Law Students (and Lawyers) Need to Know History’ (1995-1996) 42 Wayne Law Review 1603-1615.
5.DIbbetson, ‘The Challenges of Comparative Legal History’ (2013) 1 (1) Comparative Legal History 1-11
6.K J M Smith and J P S McLaren ‘History’s Living Legacy: An Outline of "Modern" Historiography of the Common Law’ (2001) 21 Legal Studies 251-324.
7.M Lobban, ‘The Varieties of Legal History’ (2012) 5 Clio Themis 1-29.
8.R W Gordon, ‘Critical Legal Histories’ (1984) 36 Stanford Law Review 57-125.
9.D Sugarman and G R Rubin, ‘Towards a New History of Law and Material Society in England 1750-1914’ in G R Rubin and D Sugarman, (eds) Law, Economy & Society (Professional Books, 1984) 1-123 (+ notes i to ixiii)
10. Z Tamanaha, ‘The Unrecognized Triumph of Historical Jurisprudence’ (2013) 91 Texas Law Review 615-632.

Volume 2: Public Law

11.P Wormald, ‘Maitland and Anglo-Saxon Law: Beyond Doomsday Book’ in J Hudson, (ed) The History of English Law: Centenary Essays on ‘Pollock and Maitland’ (Oxford University Press, 1996)1-20.
12.J H Baker, ‘The Changing Concept of a Court’ in J H Baker, The Legal Profession and the Common Law (Hambledon Press, 1986) 153-169.
13.R V Turner, ‘The Origins of Common Pleas and the King’s Bench’ (1977) 21 American Journal of Legal History 238-254.
14.T S Haskett, ‘The Medieval English Court of Chancery’ (1996) 14 Law & History Review 245-313.
15.C Morris, ‘William I and the Church Courts’ (1967) English Historical Review 449-463.
16.J H Baker, ‘Magna Carta and Personal Liberty’ in R Griffith-Jones and M Hill (ed) Magna Carta, Religion and the Rule of Law (Cambridge University Press, 2015) 81-108.
17.J H Baker, ‘English Law and the Renaissance’ (1985) 44(1) Cambridge Law Journal 46-61.
18.N Doe, ‘The Positivist Thesis in 15th Century Legal Theory and Practice’ (1990) 11 Journal of Legal History 29-39.
19.D J Seipp, ‘The Reception of Canon Law and Civil Law in the Common Law Courts before 1660’(1993) 13 (3) Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 388-420.
20.J Guy, ‘The Origins of the Petition of Right Reconsidered’ (1982) 25 2 Historical Journal 289-312.
21.G W Cox, ‘Was the Glorious Revolution a Constitutional Watershed? (2012) 72 (3) Journal of Economic History 567-600.
22.W Prest, ‘Law Reform in the Eighteenth Century’ in P Birks (ed), The Life of the Law(Hambledon Press, 1993) 113-123.
23.H W Arthurs, ‘Special Courts, Special Law: Legal Pluralism in Nineteenth Century England’ in G R Rubin and D Sugarman (eds), Law, Economy & Society (Professional Books, 1984) 380-411 (+ i to xiii)
24.J W F Allison, ‘History to Understand, and History to Reform, English Public Law’, (2013) 72 (3) Cambridge Law Journal 526-557

Volume 3: Land Law

25.R V Turner, ‘Henry II’s Aims in Reforming England’s Land Law: Feudal or Royalist’ in E B King and S J Ridyard, Law in Medieval Life and Thought (Sewanee Medieval Studies, 1990) 121-135, as reprinted in R V Turner, Judges, Administrators and the Common Law in Angevin England (Hambledon Press, 1994) 1-15.
26.T P Gallanis, ‘The Evolution of the Common Law’ in T L Harris (ed) Studies in Canon Law and Common Law in Honor of R H Helmholz (The Robbins Collection, 2015) 61-82.
27.S E Thorne, ‘English Feudalism and Estates in Land’ (1959) Cambridge Law Journal 193-209.
28.T G Watkin, ‘Feudal Theory, Social Needs and the Rise of the Heritable Fee’ (1979) 10 Cambrian Law Review 39-62.
29.J W Cairns and G Mcleod, ‘Thomas Craig, Sir Martin Wright, and Sir William Blackstone: The English Discovery of Feudalism’ (2000) 21 Journal of Legal History 54-66.
30.S F C Milsom, ‘Inheritance by Women in the Twelfth and Early Thirteenth Centuries’ in M S Arnold, T A Green, S A Scully and S D White (eds) On the Laws and Customs of England: Essays in Honor of Samuel E Thorne (Univeristy of North Carolina Press, 1981) 60-89.
31.J L Barton, ‘The Rise of the Fee Simple’ 92 (1976) Law Quarterly Review108-121.
32.AAvini, ‘The Origins of the Modern English Trust Revisited’ (1996) 70 Tulane Law Review 1139-1163.
33.R H Helmholz, ‘The Early Enforcement of Uses’ (1979) 79 Columbia Law Review 1503-1513.
34.J Guy, ‘The Development of Equitable Jurisdictions 1450-1550’ in E W Ives and AH Manchester (eds) Law, Litigants and the Legal Profession (Royal Historical Society Studies in History Series no 36, 1983) 80-86, as reprinted in J Guy, Politics, Law and Counsel in Tudor and Early Stuart England (Ashgate, 2000).
35.N G Jones, ‘Tyrrel's Case (1557) and the Use upon a Use’ (1993) 14 Journal of Legal History75-93.
36.A R Buck, ‘The Politics of Land Law in Tudor England 1529-1540’ (1990) 11Journal of Legal History200-217.
37.E Spring, ‘Landowners, Lawyers, and Land Law Reform in Nineteenth Century England’ (1977) 21(1) American Journal of Legal History 40-59.
38.N Doe and S Pulleyn, ‘The Durability of Maxims of Canon Law: From Regulae Iuristo Canonical Principles’ in T L Harris (ed) Studies in Canon Law and Common Law in Honor of R H Helmholz (The Robbins Collection, 2015) 303-336
39.W S Holdsworth, ‘The Reform of the Land Law: An Historical Retrospect’ (1926) 42 Law Quarterly Review 158-183.

Volume 4: Law of Obligations

40.J H Baker, ‘The History of the Common Law of Contract’ (1977) 21(4) American Journal of Legal History 335-341, as reprinted in J H Baker, Collected Papers on English Legal History (Cambridge University Press, 2013) 1099-1106.
41.J Biancalana, ‘Actions of Covenant 1200-1300’ (2002) 20 Legal History Review 1-57.
42.S F C Milsom, ‘Trespass From Henry III to Edward III: Part 1: General Writs’ (1958) 74 Law Quarterly Review195-224.
43.S F C Milsom, ‘Trespass From Henry III to Edward III: Part 1: Part 2: Special Writs’ (1958) 74 Law Quarterly Review 407-436.
44.S F C Milsom, ‘Trespass From Henry III to Edward III: Part 3: More Special Writs and Conclusions’ (1958) 74 Law Quarterly Review 561-590.
45.S F C Milsom, ‘Not Doing is No Trespass: A View of the Boundaries of Case’ [1954] Cambridge Law Journal 105-117.
46.T G Watkin, ‘The Significance of "In Consimili Casu" (1979) 23 American Journal of Legal History 283-311.
47.M S Arnold, ‘Accident, Mistake, and Rules of Liability in the Fourteenth Century Law of Torts’ (1979- 1980) 128 University of Pennsylvania Law Review 361-378.
48.J H Baker, ‘Origin of the Doctrine of "Consideration" in M S Arnold, T A Green, S A Scully and S D White (eds) On the Laws and Customs of England: Essays in Honor of Samuel E Thorne (University of North Carolina Press, 1981) 336-358.
49.D Ibbetson, ‘Sixteenth Century Contract Law: Slade’s Case in Context’ (1984) 4 Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 295-317.
50.S Waddams, ‘Equity in EnglishContractLaw: The Impact of the Judicature Acts (1873-75)’ (2012) 33(2)Journal of Legal History185-208.
51.M J Horwitz, ‘The Historical Foundations of Modern Contract Law’ (1974) 87 Harvard Law Review 917-956.
52.J H Baker, ‘The Common Law of Negligence 1500-1700’in J H Schrage (ed)Negligence: The Comparative History of the Law of Torts (Duncker & Humblot, 2001) 47–71,a s reprinted in J H Baker, Collected Papers on English Legal History (Cambridge University Press, 2013).
53.K M. Teeven, A History of Legislative Reform of the Common Law of Contract’ (1994-5) 26 University of Toledo Law Review 35-80.