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Vol 22 No 9 Sept/Oct 2017

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Corruption and Misuse of Public Office

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International Cultural Heritage Law in Armed Conflict: Case-Studies of Syria, Libya, Mali, the Invasion of Iraq, and the Buddhas of Bamiyan


ISBN13: 9781107169210
Published: March 2017
Publisher: Cambridge University Press
Country of Publication: UK
Format: Hardback
Price: £85.00



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This book fills gaps in the exploration of the protection of cultural heritage in armed conflict based on the World Heritage Convention.

Marina Lostal offers a new perspective, designating a specific protection regime to world cultural heritage sites, which is so far lacking despite the fact that such sites are increasingly targeted. Lostal spells out this area's discrete legal principles, providing accessible and succinct guidelines to a usually complex web of international conventions.

Using the conflicts in Syria, Libya and Mali (among others) as case studies, she offers timely insight into the phenomenon of cultural heritage destruction. Lastly, by incorporating the World Heritage Convention into the discourse, this book fulfills UNESCO's long-standing project of exploring 'how to promote the systemic integration between the [World Heritage] Convention of 1972 and the other UNESCO regimes'. It is sure to engender debate and cause reflection over cultural heritage and protection regimes.

Subjects:
Public International Law, Art and Cultural Heritage Law
Contents:
Introduction
1. Two wrong ways of thinking about the legal protection of cultural property in armed conflict
2. The systemic approach: international cultural heritage law and armed conflict
3. The World Heritage Convention as the field's common legal denominator
4. Syria: a case study of the interplay between the World Heritage Convention and the 1954 Hague Convention
5. Libya and Mali: a case study of the interplay between the World Heritage Convention and the Second Protocol
6.
2003 Iraq and Afghanistan: the World Heritage Convention as the lowest legal common denominator for the protection of cultural heritage in all contexts
Conclusion.