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Vol 21 No 11 Nov/Dec 2016

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Criminal Injuries Compensation Claims

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Reform and Punishment

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ISBN13: 9781903240946
ISBN: 1903240948
Published: July 2002
Publisher: Willan Publishing
Format: Hardback
Price: £90.00



In this book, based on papers originally presented at a recent Cambridge Cropwood conference, a group of leading authorities address the key issues surrounding the future of sentencing in Britain, in the light particularly of the highly influential Halliday Report. These proposals for reform amount to the single most ambitious and comprehensive set of proposals for reconstituting the sentencing system of a common-law country, and include proposals to replace existing sentencing statutes, the establishment of a sentencing commission and sentencing guidelines, and the creation of a sentence review function in the judiciary.;The book also explores the broader set of policy problems and implications which are raised by the Halliday Report, drawing upon experiences of reform in other jurisdictions and contexts, particularly that of the USA. This book should be useful reading for anybody with an interest in the future of sentencing or the future direction of the criminal justice system.

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Contents:
Foreword (Sue Rex and Michael Tonry); 1 Sentencing futures, by Sue Rex and Michael Tonry (University of Cambridge); 2 Public opinion and sentencing policy, by Julian Roberts (University of Ottawa); 3 Relations between the lay and professional judiciaries: now and Auld, by Rod Morgan (Chief Inspector, HM Inspectorate of Probation); 4 Taking account of race, ethnicity and religion, by David Faulkner (University of Oxford); 5 Setting sentencing policy through guidelines, by Michael Tonry (University of Cambridge); 6 The uses of imprisonmnet, by Alison Liebling (University of Cambridge); 7 Reinventing Community Penalties: the role of communication, by Sue Rex (University of Cambridge); 8 Convict re-entry: a slogan in search of a narrative, by Shadd Maruna and Thomas LaBell (University of Cambridge and State University of New York, Albany); 9 Judges as sentencing reviewers, by Michael Smith (University of Wisconsin); 10 Sentencing persistent offenders, by Peter Jones (Circuit Judge, member of Sentencing Advisory Committee); 11 Record-driven sentencing: reflections on the Halliday Report's proposed treatment of prior conventions, by Andrew von Hirsch (University of Cambrdige); 12 Appendix: conference summary, by David Green (University of Cambridge) Index