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Vol 21 No 10 Oct/Nov 2016

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The Discourse of Court Interpreting

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ISBN13: 9789027216588
ISBN: 9027216584
Published: June 2004
Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing Company
Format: Hardback
Price: £67.00



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Contents:
Acknowledgements XI; Introduction XIII
Chapter 1; Court interpreting: The main issues 1.1 Introduction 1; 1.2 Accuracy of interpretation 2; 1.2.1 The interpreting process 3; 1.2.2 Pragmatic equivalence 5; 1.3 The role of the court interpreter 8; 1.4 Conclusion 14
Chapter 2; Historical overview of Court Interpreting in Australia 15; 2.1 Introduction 15; 2.2 Review of Government Reports on Interpreting and Translation; Services in Australia 16; 2.3 The Australian legal interpreter today 25; 2.3.1 Legal Interpreting Training 26; 2.3.2 Research 27; 2.4 Conclusion: A matter of access and equity 28
Chapter 3; Courtroom questioning and the interpreter 31; 3.1 Introduction 31; 3.1.1 The discourse of the adversarial system 31; 3.1.2 The purpose of examination-in-chief and cross-examination 33; 3.1.3 Question form and type 33; 3.1.4 Pragmatic function of questions 35; 3.1.5 Interpreting courtroom questions 36; 3.2 The study 37; 3.2.1 The data 37; 3.2.2 Question type according to examination type 40; 3.2.3 Original counsel questions in English and their Spanish interpreted; versions 42; 3.2.3.1 Cross-examination questions through the interpreter 43; 3.2.3.2 Tag questions 44; 3.2.3.3 Tag questions in English 45; 3.2.3.4 Tag questions in Spanish 46; 3.2.4 Interpreters' renditions of each type of tag question in; cross-examination 48; 3.2.4.1 Invariant tag questions - Positive declaratives with positive; ratification tag - ""Is that right?"" / ""Is that correct?"" 48; 3.2.4.2 Invariant Tag questions - Negative declaratives with positive; ratification tag - ""Is that right?"" / ""Is that correct?"" 50; 3.2.4.3 Constant Polarity Tag - Positive declaratives with positive auxiliary; tag - ""You work all night, do you?"" 50; 3.2.4.4 Checking Tags 52; 3.2.5 Examination-in-chief questions through the interpreter 55; 3.3 Conclusion 58
Chapter 4; The use of discourse markers in courtroom questions 61; 4.1 Introduction 61; 4.2 Uses of ""well"" and ""now"" in examination-in-chief 63; 4.2.1 Uses of ""well"" in examination-in-chief 63; 4.2.1.1 Interpreters' renditions of ""well"" in examination-in-chief 63; 4.2.2 The uses of ""now"" in examination-in-chief 66; 4.2.2.1 The interpretation of ""now"" in examination-in-chief 68; 4.3 Uses of ""well"", ""see"" and ""now"" in cross-examination 68; 4.3.1 Uses of ""well"" in cross-examination 71; 4.3.1.1 The omission of ""well"" in the interpreter's renditions 72; 4.3.2 The uses of ""see"" in cross-examination 79; 4.3.2.1 The interpreter's treatment of ""you see"" 80; 4.3.3 The uses of ""now"" in cross-examination 84; 4.3.3.1 The interpreter's renditions of ""now"" in cross-examination questions 85; 4.4 Conclusion 85
Chapter 5; The style of the Spanish speaking witnesses' answers and the interpreters' renditions 87; 5.1 Introduction 87; 5.1.1 Speech style and theevaluation of character 87; 5.1.1.1 The evaluation of witness's character 90; 5.2 The style of the Spanish answers and their interpretation into English 95; 5.2.1 The data 95; 5.2.2 Analysis of hesitations 9